A vet got more than he bargained for when he discovered a baby fox in his dishwasher – and was stunned when news of his uninvited guest spread across the globe.

Fox in dishwasher.
What the fox? The cub as it was found by Dr Hayes.

Simon Hayes, director of Village Vet in north London, discovered the cub crammed into his dishwasher among plates and cutlery after sneaking in through the back door of the house.

“I was loading the dishwasher, got distracted by something in another room, then went back into the kitchen and there, sitting in the bottom of the dishwasher, was a little fox cub,” Dr Hayes said.

Scared? Or surprised?

“It was obviously more scared to see me than I was to see the fox. I was surprised it found its way in there.

“I tried to help the cub to get out, but it was more intent on chewing the dishwasher racks than leaving the premises.”

Dr Hayes moved the tray from the bottom of the machine to give the cub an exit route, but it remained put.

“I tried to shoo it out, but it was obviously scared and became a bit guarded and aggressive and I decided putting my hands in there was probably a bad idea, having been bitten too many times in my career,” he laughed.

Viral video

Eventually, a broom was used to gently coax the creature out.

“He got a bit upset by it, but eventually found a gap, jumped over the dishwasher tray and ran out the back door to his mum that was calling it from the end of the garden,” Dr Hayes said.

While the incident surprised Dr Hayes, he was even more amazed when – having written about the incident on his blog, Vetsimon and posted a photo – the story went viral and spread around the world.

The original uncut video can be found on YouTube.

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