BEVA is reminding owners and vets this autumn of the potential risk of seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM), also referred to as atypical myopathy.

Seeds from the sycamore tree contain hypoglycin A, which causes SPM.

SPM is a highly fatal muscle disease in horses caused by the toxin hypoglycin A, contained in tree seeds – including the sycamore.


While sycamore seeds may not be directly palatable to horses, those grazing on poor quality pasture may ingest considerable numbers of them.

Horses kept in sparse pastures with an accumulation of dead sycamore leaves, dead wood and trees in or around the pasture and without access to supplementary hay or feed, are the most susceptible.

Plan ahead

Mark Bowen, senior vice-president of BEVA, warned horse owners: “Please plan ahead and take steps now to prevent the risk of your horse contracting seasonal pasture myopathy.

It’s a devastating condition that can frequently be fatal despite treatment. If you are worried about the safety of your grazing, speak to your veterinary practice for advice.”

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of


related content

The college celebrated its latest milestone with a weekend of events including an ethical debate, talks, a film screening and a glamorous gala dinner.

4 mins

A horse health care and management app has been launched by Zoetis to help vets communicate more effectively with clients and improve patient compliance rates and loyalty.

3 mins

Liz Harwood of Hook Norton Veterinary Practice in Oxon has won the Virbac 3D Worming Equine SQP of the Year Award for her dedication to the responsible prescribing of equine POM-VPS medicines.

3 mins

Andy Durham outlines some diagnostic and treatment approaches to ulceration of the cornea presenting in horses.

21 mins

Buprelieve is a buprenorphine solution for injection licensed for postoperative analgesia in dogs, cats and horses.

3 mins

Charlotte Maile covers another horse topic in the latest Practice Notes column.

14 mins