Cases of diabetes in dogs and cats have risen by 900% since 2011, according to a five-year study of almost 9,000 animals.

Animal Friends' research found a 900% increase in diabetes cases in dogs and cats since 2011. Source: Freeimages
Animal Friends’ research found a 900% increase in diabetes cases in dogs and cats since 2011.

Animal Friends Insurance’s research found cats are at higher risk of diabetes, with a 1,161% increase compared to an 850% rise for dogs.

The survey was conducted among Animal Friends policyholders who owned a total of between 400,000 and 600,000 pets over the survey period. Of these, the company chose 9,000 animals that remained insured with it for the entire period. The data was based on claims made for diabetes and related treatments.

‘Shocking’

Westley Pearson, director of claims and marketing for Animal Friends, said: “With weight issues and diabetes on the rise among humans, we assumed we would find the same in people’s pets, but the 900% rise we uncovered was shocking. It shows a clear gap in Britain’s knowledge regarding proper care of its pets.

“The fact the increase is much higher than in humans suggests, while people are beginning to think more about their health, their pets are being left on their old diet and exercise regimes.”

  • Read more about Animal Friends’ study in VT46.23.
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