Dechra Veterinary Products has launched an interactive website for owners of dogs with hypoadrenocortism.

The site – www.myaddisonsdog.co.uk – aims to demystify the condition and contains information and resources to help owners understand the condition and monitor their pet’s progress.

tabletSymptoms

Canine hypoadrenocorticism, or Addison’s disease, is caused by a reduction in corticosteroid secretion from the adrenal glands. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, lack of appetite, tremors, muscle weakness, low heart rate and collapse.

Earlier this year, Dechra launched Zycortal, the only European licensed treatment for the condition.

Interactive treatment

Craig Sankey, brand manager at Dechra, said: “The site features sections describing the signs and symptoms of Addison’s disease, how the condition is diagnosed and treated, to provide support for a dog’s journey back to health.

“Owners can also sign up for an interactive treatment log book to chart the progress of their pet’s treatment and provide reassurance about how their dog is responding to Zycortal therapy.”

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