Virbac has released a video urging vets to offer dog owners a choice when it comes to castration.

Veterinary view castration.
Virbac’s video was produced as part of the Veterinary View series.

The video follows research showing half of vets said they offer alternatives to surgical neutering.

Survey data

In a survey of 411 vets looking at attitudes to castration, 76% of those questioned recommended neutering as a routine procedure for all male dogs, while only 52% said they offered clients alternatives to surgical neutering.

The Virbac-supported study was carried out by veterinary epidemiology consultant Vicki Adams.

She said: “The survey showed, while most vets recommended permanent neutering as a routine procedure, more than 90% also agreed medical castration was an option when an owner wants to assess whether castration will improve a male dog’s behaviour.”

Reversible options

Virbac produces Suprelorin, a slow-release implant containing the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist deslorelin. Once injected under the dog’s skin, the continuous slow release of deslorelin causes an interruption of the pituitary gonadal axis, reducing testosterone production and suppressing testicular reproductive function, including libido.

Virbac product manager Sarah Dixon said: “The decision as to whether to permanently castrate their dog is something some owners can struggle with; yet, from a health and lifestyle perspective, there are many good reasons to do it.

“While surgical castration is the most common solution – and, in many cases, is the right option – it is not the only solution and medical castration may offer specific benefits in many types of cases.”

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