BCF Technology has released a series of free videos on its website covering what focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) scanning is, when to use it and how to interpret findings.

Ben Sullivan presents BCF’s latest procedural video.

Multiple views

Imaging expert Ben Sullivan presents the video, which also covers multiple views including diaphramaticohepatic view, splenorenal view, cystocolic view and hepatorenal view.

The videos are available in the small animal learning section of the BCF website in the clinical resources area.

Ongoing commitment

Mr Sullivan said: “This series of videos aims to help vets learn how to perform the abdominal ultrasound FAST scanning technique. We created these videos as part of our ongoing commitment to learning in the veterinary industry. If you have any ideas for useful learning materials we could create in future, do let me know.”

There are nine short videos in total, which explain the procedure and are available from the BCF Technology website.

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