Veterinary surgeons are being urged to complete a survey on the effects of passive smoking in pets and what they feel their role should be when it comes to tackling the issue.

cigarette smoke
Prof Clare Knottenbelt’s survey aims to gauge UK veterinary surgeons’ attitudes to environmental tobacco smoke exposure in companion animals.

Clare Knottenbelt, a professor of small animal medicine and oncology (small animal clinical sciences) at the University of Glasgow, is asking vets across the UK to take part in her survey, in a bid to gauge attitudes around the concept and how they see their role.

Significant effects

Prof Knottenbelt said: “It is widely accepted in human medicine exposure to environmental tobacco smoke through second hand smoke can be significant in both adults and children and is a known cause of smoking related disease.

“Recent studies in dogs have shown they are also exposed to second hand smoke when their human companions smoke. Anecdotal evidence suggests vets rarely enquire about tobacco smoke exposure in the pets they are treating.”

London Vet Show

Prof Knottenbelt will be at the University of Glasgow stand at London Vet Show (LVS) to discuss the pet health issues related to passive smoke exposure.

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