Virbac has extended its large animal vaccine range with the launch of Bovigen Scour, an emulsion for injection that reduces the severity of diarrhoea caused by bovine rotavirus, bovine coronavirus and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli F5 (K99).

Bovigen ScourBovigen Scour works by actively immunising pregnant cows and heifers and providing passive immunity to their calves via colostrum. It also helps reduce the shedding of virus by calves infected with bovine rotavirus and coronavirus.

Easy planning

According to Virbac, a key benefit of Bovigen Scour is the vaccination protocol that offers a large window for injection, making it easier for planning. The primary course is administered in two shots, with the first dose five to 12 weeks before calving and a booster three weeks later. The annual booster is due three to 12 weeks before calving is expected.

The vaccine comes in two sizes: 15ml (5 doses) and 90ml (30 doses). The dosage per cow is 3ml and the withdrawal time is nil in milk.

Convenient

Virbac large animal product manager Brigitte Goasduf said: “Bovigen Scour offers farmers flexibility and ease of use. The flexibility it gives in terms of scheduling the primary course and booster is particularly important and is highly relevant for beef cattle farmers, as it can be difficult to know exactly when a cow is likely to calve and it is vital not to miss the vaccination window.

“Bovigen Scour is also convenient to give because of the small volume of emulsion and the injection is given intramuscularly. Its launch extends our large animal vaccine range for the active immunisation of sheep and goats against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.”

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