The NOAH compendium website has moved to a new platform to improve usability and provide access for applications.

NOAH compendium
The new NOAH compendium website has been optimised for ease of viewing on mobile phones and tablets as well as traditional desktops.

NOAH spokesman Joanne Jeffs said: “We know more people are accessing the site using mobile technology and, in order that the site can be viewed more easily on mobile phones and tablets as well as traditional desktops, we needed to move the whole complex set of data to a new web platform.”

Data integrity

She explained:  “This is only one of the advantages of the move – it will enable us to finalise our compendium app, for example, and, further down the line, will enable more bespoke information access to become available via an application programming interface feed – and we needed to take this major step for progress to be made.

“The most important thing was to maintain the integrity of the data – prescribers and users of animal medicines rely on its accuracy to make their prescribing decisions and guide responsible use. We know this has been done.”

Post-launch issues

She added: “With the move, we know there are some post-launch issues we are addressing. We are working on those as quickly as we can. We know users need to print data sheets, for example, and this function will soon be back online. We welcome all feedback and thank all our users for their patience.

“The invaluable online compendium resource will become even more user-friendly and focused for the needs of those who rely on it.”

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