The NOAH compendium website has moved to a new platform to improve usability and provide access for applications.

NOAH compendium
The new NOAH compendium website has been optimised for ease of viewing on mobile phones and tablets as well as traditional desktops.

NOAH spokesman Joanne Jeffs said: “We know more people are accessing the site using mobile technology and, in order that the site can be viewed more easily on mobile phones and tablets as well as traditional desktops, we needed to move the whole complex set of data to a new web platform.”

Data integrity

She explained:  “This is only one of the advantages of the move – it will enable us to finalise our compendium app, for example, and, further down the line, will enable more bespoke information access to become available via an application programming interface feed – and we needed to take this major step for progress to be made.

“The most important thing was to maintain the integrity of the data – prescribers and users of animal medicines rely on its accuracy to make their prescribing decisions and guide responsible use. We know this has been done.”

Post-launch issues

She added: “With the move, we know there are some post-launch issues we are addressing. We are working on those as quickly as we can. We know users need to print data sheets, for example, and this function will soon be back online. We welcome all feedback and thank all our users for their patience.

“The invaluable online compendium resource will become even more user-friendly and focused for the needs of those who rely on it.”

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of


related content

People are becoming more and more aware of the value of their data and, even more importantly, the impact if that data is misused, says Neil Matthews.

10 mins

Digital media has revolutionised the way many vets and VNs fulfil their CPD obligations. Accessing learning online is often cheaper, faster and more convenient than traditional modalities. So, is there still a case to be made for event-based learning? James Westgate reports.

16 mins

Visitors to Zoetis’ stand at London Vet Show 2016 will discover how advances in technology will change the future practice of veterinary medicine.

3 mins

Vets have been urged to stand firm in the fight against antimicrobial resistance and learn to say no when owners demand unnecessary antibiotics for their sick pets.

4 mins

Having stewarded at BEVA congress, student blogger Jordan Sinclair offers a round-up of sessions looking at the future of equine practice – which included suggestions as diverse as an "Uber" for equine vets.

10 mins

The whole spine of a large dog can be MRI scanned in one sweep without moving the patient, thanks to a world-first design from Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging.

4 mins