Royal Canin has appointed Katy Smith as veterinary support manager at its head office in Castle Cary, Somerset.

Katy Smith
Katy Smith, new veterinary support manager at Royal Canin.

Ms Smith’s new role will see her manage the launch of products, speak at industry conferences and support the company’s veterinary business managers in developing relationships with practices across the UK and Ireland.

Multifunction diet

Her first task will be to introduce Royal Canin’s new Multifunction diet to veterinary practices.

With a combined 10 years’ experience in the veterinary and marketing industries, Ms Smith has a degree from the University of Nottingham in veterinary medicine and surgery, in addition to a Master’s degree in business management.

Prior to her appointment, Ms Smith was a vet at a small animal practice in Derbyshire and worked in a marketing and events role in London.

Educating vets and VNs first priority

Ms Smith, said: “My new role is unique in that I’m able to combine my varied employment history. As a veterinary support manager my responsibilities are constantly evolving and I’m speaking with different colleagues and practices every day.

“As my first priority, I’m looking forward to educating vets and vet nurses about our new Multifunction diet and seeing its results first-hand.”

Multifunction is only available through veterinary practices and is being offered with personalised packaging, including the practice logo and patient name.

 

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