Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have completed the largest genetic study of dogs to date.

DNA
The domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is considered an excellent animal model for human disease, with more than 350 diseases in common.

The study, published on 22 January in Nature Communications, investigated 180,000 genetic markers that can help link an inherited disease with the responsible gene.

Shared diseases

The study has been hailed as a step towards efficiently mapping genes responsible for complex diseases in dogs and, eventually, humans.

Dogs share more than 350 diseases with humans – from hip dysplasia to lymphoma – and similar pathways and genes often underlie these shared diseases.

The researchers identified areas on the genome associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumor and granulomatous colitis – and the genes that influence such traits as body size, fur length and shedding.

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

Millions of dogs could enjoy longer, healthier lives if vets were to change their approach to the treatment of osteoarthritis, according to an orthopaedic specialist.

4 mins

Louise O'Dwyer takes a look at the relationship between pre-surgery fasting and anaesthesia in December's Nursing Notes.

8 mins

Rory O’Connor offers practical advice for VNs to prevent mental health issues occurring – and to ensure you don’t suffer in silence.

19 mins

Pam Mosedale explains the responsibilities of suitably qualified persons (SQPs) in practice.

20 mins

BVA figures show one-in-three vets who treat pets have seen puppies they believe to have been illegally imported from overseas in the last year.

6 mins

Boehringer Academy and Buscopan 20 are offering vets the chance to win one of 30 rectal tops for equine rectal examination by watching its CPD video.

2 mins