Three vulnerable kittens have been rescued after they were thrown on to a veterinary practice roof.

kittens on roof
The three kittens were found hiding around an air conditioning unit (click to zoom).

The RSPCA was contacted after a member of the public saw a man throwing the felines on to the Oakfield Veterinary Group building on Margaret Road in Atherstone, Warwickshire at 9:30am on 18 June.

The trio – two females and a male – were found hiding around an air conditioning unit and are in the RSPCA’s care.

Vulnerable

RSPCA inspector Laura Bryant said: “These poor kittens thankfully were not on the roof for long; however, if the member of the public had not witnessed this then the kittens could still have been up there.

“At only a few weeks old, they are vulnerable and it would have been terrible for them to have been left outside for a long time – particularly with the recent heavy rain we have had.

Appeal for information

Ms Bryant added: “We are keen to find the person responsible and are urging anyone who may recognise the kittens or has any information to contact us in confidence on 0300 123 8018.”

The kittens – all thought to be around 10 weeks old – have been named Dot, Flo and Chester.

Kittens from roof

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