The whole spine of a large dog can be MRI scanned in one sweep without moving the patient, thanks to a world-first design from Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging.

v-shaped spine coil
The V-shaped spine coil makes patient positioning easier and increases the coil sensitivity by more than 20%, claims Hallmarq.

The company says its metre-long, v-shaped spine coil also makes patient positioning easier and increases the coil sensitivity by more than 20% compared with an equivalent “flat” spine coil typically found in human MRI scanners.

Optimal imaging

The v-shaped spine coil also helps to produce images of hard-to-view areas and can be used with a flexible coil over the chest of the dog for optimal imaging of the brachial plexus region.

Hallmarq technical director Steve Roberts said: “While we use many of the elements of a human MRI – for instance, we use a 1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet – we feel it is very important to listen to veterinary specialists and identify where the needs are when it comes to creating high-quality images of veterinary patients.

“As our only focus is on veterinary imaging, we will continue to develop groundbreaking technology to meet those specific needs.”

Fitted as standard

The new coil has 16 receive channels and is longer than 1m, making it optimal for large-breed dog spine imaging for conditions such as intervertebral disc disease. It means, when scanning large dogs, the patient bed can be moved along and appropriate coil elements selected to image the whole spine without having to move the animal.

It will come as standard in Hallmarq’s PetVet MRI scanners and existing scanners will be able to use the longer coil.

  • For further information, telephone Hallmarq on 01483 877812 or visit www.hallmarq.net
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