Researchers in the US have found Bisphenol A (BPA) – an endocrine-disrupting industrial chemical used in the lining of food cans – may increase BPA concentrations in pets.

Image: © Fotolia/giolak2.
Image: © Fotolia/giolak2.

Cheryl Rosenfeld, an associate professor of biomedical sciences at the University of Missouri – College of Veterinary Medicine and an investigator in the university’s Bond Life Sciences Center, said: “We wanted to determine if short-term feeding of widely available commercial canned food could alter BPA concentrations in dogs. Thus, we assessed BPA contained within pet food cans.

“We also analysed whether disturbances in bacteria found in the gut and metabolic changes could be associated with exposure to BPA from the canned food.”

Microbiome assessments

Dog owners volunteered their healthy pets for the study. Blood and faecal samples were collected prior to the dogs being placed on one of two commonly used, commercial canned food diets for two weeks; one diet was presumed to be BPA-free.

Researchers then analysed the cans and the food contained in the cans for BPA levels and performed gut microbiome assessments.

Increased concentrations

Prof Rosenfeld said: “The dogs in the study did have minimal circulating BPA in their blood when it was drawn for the baseline. However, BPA increased nearly three-fold after being on either of the two canned diets for two weeks.

“We also found increased serum BPA concentrations were correlated with gut microbiome and metabolic changes in the dogs analysed. Increased BPA may also reduce one bacterium that has the ability to metabolise BPA and related environmental chemicals.”

The work was published in Science of the Total Environment.

 

 

Image: © Fotolia/giolak2.

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