phone photo
The stuck cat was spotted outside a paper recycling firm in Kent.

The RSPCA is reminding people of the dangers of litter around animals, after helping a cat that got its head stuck in a glass jar.

The feline was spotted outside a paper recycling firm in Kent on 24 May, prompting staff to telephone the animal welfare charity.

Cat trap

RSPCA animal collection officer (ACO) Emma Byrne said: “I spotted the frightened and confused cat under a portable cabin, but couldn’t reach it, so set up a trap.”

The team went back to check on the cat that night, but it had not ventured out of its hiding place and stayed hidden for the next couple of days.

Officers eventually caught the cat on 26 May when it was spotted in the middle of the yard (see picture). It was freed from the jar and a health check revealed it was uninjured and in good condition.

Correct waste disposal

The incident is a reminder of why it is so important to dispose of litter properly, the RSPCA said.

Ms Byrne said: “Leaving litter lying around can be dangerous for wildlife and pets. This puss had a lucky escape, but discarded jars, tin cans, elastic bands or carrier bags can be a real death trap for animals and birds.

“We would urge everyone to do their bit and throw their rubbish away properly. Or, if you see rubbish littering your pavements, verges and parks, please pop it in a nearby bin.”

jar cat
“Discarded jars, tin cans, elastic bands or carrier bags can be a death trap for animals and birds.”
View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

A vet whose research established diabetes mellitus (DM) in one-in-four UK cats is caused by a pituitary gland tumour has begun a collaboration with human medical experts that has potentially “huge” health implications.

5 mins

Marge Chandler looks at the factors impacting on canine and feline weight gain to help equip VNs with the information they need in battling the pet bulge.

26 mins

Britain’s largest pet insurance firm is reviewing the registration process for its breeder scheme following allegations in a Sunday newspaper.

5 mins

Ellen Lavender discusses recharging the batteries and sampling the natural life in the Pacific Ocean national park.

13 mins

Analysing cytological specimens as part of a gastrointestinal endoscopy could aid veterinary diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study.

3 mins

The fine – the first in the Scottish SPCA’s 178-year history – was imposed after the society admitted staff at a now closed wildlife centre were put at risk of exposure to hazardous allergens from birds’ droppings and feathers.

2 mins