Zoetis has launched an oral medication for treatment of flea, tick and mite infestations in dogs.

Simparica packshot
Simparica treats fleas, ticks and mite infestations in dogs.

Simparica provides, quick and continuous protection for 35 days. Delivered as a chewable tablet, the product kills a broad spectrum of ectoparasites, including:

  • Rhipicephalus sanguineus
  • Dermacentor reticulatus
  • Ixodes hexagonus
  • Ixodes ricinus
  • Ctenocephalides felis
  • Ctenocephalides canis
  • Sarcoptes scabiei

The medication can also be used as part of a treatment strategy for flea allergy dermatitis, while laboratory evidence has shown efficacy for Demodex canis and Otodectes cynotis.

Better late than never

Zoetis believes Simparica’s ability to provide continuous protection up to and beyond the monthly treatment period is very important for pet owners, as 63% have confessed to apply flea and tick treatment later than it was due, with the median being five days late.

Once applied, the product begins to kill fleas within three hours and within eight hours for I ricinus.

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