Dogs Trust has expressed deep regret and disappointment at the Scottish Government’s plans to consult on the possible relaxation of tail docking legislation for certain working dogs, namely spaniels and hunt point retrievers.

Dogs Trust.

In a statement, the charity said: “We are opposed to the docking of puppies’ tails, believing puppies suffer unnecessary pain as a result of docking and are deprived of a vital form of canine expression.”

Dogs Trust said it lobbied heavily for a complete ban on tail docking in 2007 and cited Scotland’s legislation as a key example of how the country has led the way on dog welfare issues.

The legislation presently bans all docking, other than those conducted as necessary for veterinary medical reasons, for all breeds of dog.

“We do not believe there is an accurate means by which tail docking could be genuinely restricted to puppies that later go on to be working dogs,” the charity says.

“We would consider such an exemption to be a significant loophole in the legislation as it would be impossible to differentiate between genuine owners or breeders of working dogs and those who simply say the puppies will go on to be working dogs, when, in fact, they just want the procedure performed on the animal.”

From a welfare and ethical perspective, Dogs Trust continues to question whether the reduction in possible injury risk justifies the pain involved with tail docking.

It has previously highlighted its concerns with the research carried out by the University of Glasgow and will draw on scientific evidence that proves the act of docking causes pain and also the findings pain in neonates is enhanced compared to adults.

Dogs Trust said it had grave reservations regarding the upcoming consultation and will be expressing these views and others to the Scottish Government.

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

A lack of opportunities could be to blame for the falling number of young vets prepared to work in mixed animal or farm practice.

5 mins

A charity that provides free vet care to pets of homeless and vulnerably housed people is racing against time to find funds to remain operational.

3 mins

VetEd's 2017 edition – to take place in July at the University of Liverpool – aims to provide vets and VNs the chance to explore how education could be used to support the future of the professions.

4 mins

A previously battered bird is back in the air after having its broken wing repaired by the veterinary team at Willows Veterinary Hospital in Hartford.

4 mins

Former pub transformed into “long-awaited” £1.3 million animal hospital sees visitors pour in for official opening

4 mins

Members of the RVC Zoological Society have swooped to the rescue of oft-malign vultures by supporting a charity dedicated to their conservation and protection.

3 mins