HealthforAnimals used the fifth Global Animal Health Conference in India to call for greater cooperation between national governments to improve market access for veterinary medicines.

In front of representatives from 24 countries at the Lalit New Delhi Hotel, the animal medicines association urged regulators and policymakers to build stronger regional networks to streamline regulatory systems and improve the availability of medicines.

Exchange of views

Carel du Marchie Sarvaas
Carel du Marchie Sarvaas urged delegates to apply and share what they learned at the fifth Global Animal Health Conference.

The conference brought together government representatives, regulators, industry, academia, intergovernmental bodies and international organisations to exchange views, best practices and the challenges of good regulatory governance of veterinary medicines.

Opening the conference, Samuel Thevasagayam, deputy director of agricultural development at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which supports the event, said: “Approximately 60% of smallholder farmers depend on livestock for their well-being in Africa and South Asia. It is estimated 25% of livestock production is lost due to preventable or treatable diseases.

“One of the major reasons attributable for the lack of availability and accessibility of quality veterinary medicines and vaccines is the lack of an appropriate, robust and functioning regulatory system.

“We are working, with our partners in the animal health industry and regulatory agencies, to establish a robust regulatory framework that is effective, transparent and predictable to address this massive need to eliminate the leakage of value from livestock production and help small holder farmers realise the value of livestock by further investing in feed, livestock genetics and improved husbandry.”

Harmonisation

HealthforAnimals’ executive director Carel du Marchie Sarvaas closed the conference, saying: “The purpose of the conference was to bring together people from a range of sectors to help build a greater bond and, in turn, better animal health.

“A key theme of the day has been harmonisation – chiefly, the need for regulators and governments to collaborate with other stakeholders.

“Access to quality veterinary medicines not only protect animals, but humans, their livelihoods and well-being. We hope all those at the conference apply and share today’s learnings to help us all make animals healthier.”

 

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