An Alaskan malamute has reached his first anniversary at Battersea Brands Hatch.

Theo
Looking for love: Having been at Battersea for a year, lonely Theo is longing for a new home. Photo credit: Battersea Dogs and Cats Home.

It is more than nine times the average length of stay for dogs at the charity.

Three-year-old Theo has been viewed by almost 400 potential owners since he arrived as a stray.

Yet despite dozens of appeals and pleas, he has been overlooked for 365 days.

There is no limit on how long a dog can be cared for at Battersea, but the average length of stay for a dog at the Brands Hatch centre is 40 days.

Michelle Bevan, rehoming and welfare manager, said: “We love all 500 of our canine residents who arrive at our centre every year.”

“Theo really has something special about him, winning over the hearts of so many staff and people who have met him since he arrived a year ago. He is a beautiful boy with lots of love to give.”

She added: “Our handsome Theo is energetic, mischievous and loves a fuss from the people he has built a bond with.

“New owners ideally need experience of his malamute breed and should be willing to put in additional time and effort, so he can fulfil his potential to be a wonderful pet.”

Theo also spent time in a foster home, getting used to everyday noises and enjoying the company of another dog.

  • If you’ve had experience with malamutes and think you can re-home Theo, contact 0843 509 4444 or visit www.battersea.org.uk
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