Image courtesy Sarah Caney.

Cats with hyperthyroidism are more vulnerable to bacterial UTIs. One study reported bacterial lower UTIs were diagnosed in 12% of hyperthyroid cats.

Bacterial UTIs are clinically “silent” in a high proportion of older cats, with no haematuria, dysuria, or other signs to indicate their presence.

Where possible, bacterial culture of cystocentesis-obtained urine samples (right) is recommended in hyperthyroid cats at time of diagnosis and periodically thereafter, especially if indicated by clinical signs or previous history.

Urine bacteriology twice yearly is a good idea.

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