A ban on the use of collars designed to administer an electric shock to dogs and cats in Wales comes into force today (March 24) following the approval of the regulations by Assembly members yesterday.

A ban on the use of collars designed to administer an electric shock to dogs and cats in Wales comes into force today (March 24) following the approval of the regulations by Assembly members yesterday.
 
Elin JonesThe provisions of the Animal Welfare (Electronic Collars) (Wales) Regulations 2010 came into force at one minute past midnight this morning. The ban is the first of its kind in the UK, and is the first secondary regulation that will be introduced in Wales under the Animal Welfare Act, which differs from the one in place at Westminster.
 
Wales’ rural affairs minister Elin Jones said: “I’m very pleased that Assembly members have backed the Welsh Assembly Government’s proposal to ban the use of electronic shock collars in Wales.
 
“The Welsh Assembly Government takes animal welfare very seriously, and I’m pleased that as a government, we are taking a proactive approach to promoting the welfare of animals by banning the use of such electronic training devices in Wales.”
 
However, with the ban coming in so soon after approval, she warned: “It is important that owners are aware of the ban, and that they now take appropriate steps to comply with the law.”
 
KC vote for the  ban signAfter four years of campaigning, The Kennel Club was in Cardiff to witness the motion to approve the ban. Before the final vote, local trainers from the club’s Good Citizen Dog Scheme treated Assembly members to a demonstration of how dogs can be successfully trained without the need for shock collars and aversive training techniques.
 
KC communications director Caroline Kisko said: “This is a historic day for animal welfare in Wales and we are absolutely delighted that so many AMs voted in favour of the regulations.
 
The Kennel Club was in  Cardiff to witness the motion to approve the ban“Today, Wales has proven that it is truly leading the way and we hope that the rest of the UK will follow by example to outlaw these cruel and unnecessary devices.”
 
The RSPCA also welcomed the ban. The society has long held the belief that there is no place for these devices in modern animal training and recommends the use of reward based methods instead.
 
Claire Lawson, RSPCA public affairs manager for Wales said: “We are delighted with the stance that the Welsh Assembly Government has taken in banning the use of these instruments of cruelty. They have been consigned to the dustbin of history and I hope the rest of the UK will follow suit and do the same.”

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