Vets have saved the life of a dog that bit off more than it could chew – and got a pig’s trotter stuck in its oesophagus and a pig’s tail in its stomach.

Maggie
Close call: PDSA nurse Karen Jones and vet surgeon Robert Isherwood with Maggie. Photo courtesy PDSA.

Maggie, a one-year-old bullmastiff, was rushed to Cardiff PDSA Pet Hospital retching and in distress, after devouring pig treats.

PDSA vets x-rayed Maggie and decided to operate after confirming the extent of the blockage.

PDSA nurse Karen Jones said: “Maggie was panting heavily and had a high temperature when she came in.

“We warned Maggie’s owner of the high risks when operating under general anaesthetic. But it was the only way we could get the pig’s trotter out as it was lodged so far down her oesophagus.

“We also removed the pig’s tail that was in her stomach, as it may not have passed through Maggie’s digestive system safely.

“We always advise owners not to feed any type of bones to pets and this case highlights the dangers of giving such treats. We’re thankful to funding from players of People’s Postcode Lottery, which is helping us educate owners on the type of foods and occasional treats it is safe to give.”

Maggie was kept in overnight but was able to go home the next day with a course of antibiotics.

Owner Christine Ramsay said she was horrified about what happened and warned others about the dangers of feeding such treats. She said:

“We’ve fed Maggie pigs’ trotters before and she’s been fine, as she normally chews them. But this time she wolfed it down and it got stuck. We were so worried about her; she’s our baby.

“We can’t thank PDSA vets enough, they did an amazing job. We are so relieved Maggie is back to her mad, happy self.”

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