Paton and Lee Equine Veterinary Surgeons won a free day’s registration to this year’s BEVA Congress for being the practice with the most clients taking part in a Creating Awareness and Reporting Evidence (CARE) study about laminitis.

Ben and Sam
From left: Ben Portus, director at Paton and Lee, and the company’s newest team member Sam Harrington.

The study, funded by World Horse Welfare, is collecting information about the health and management of Britain’s horses and ponies; documenting how these may change over time and how this affects the risk of laminitis developing.

Speaking volumes

It is a collaborative effort involving the RVC, the AHT and Rossdales Equine Hospital. Horse owners have to sign up and submit regular online updates regarding his or her horse’s routine care, even if the horse has never had laminitis before.

Ben Portus, one of the directors of Essex-based Paton and Lee, said: “We were so delighted to hear we had won the prize for the highest number of CARE members enrolled. It speaks volumes about our wonderful clients – they’re always so proactive, especially when it comes to such an important equine health issue as laminitis.”

CARE study recruitment closes at the end of July, with data from existing members being collected until the end of the year. There is still an opportunity for interested owners to enrol before the deadline.

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