The vet tasked with investigating a house in Tamworth where two puppies were found buried alive has described the scene as “one of the most horrific” he had ever witnessed.

The vet tasked with investigating a house in Tamworth where two puppies were found buried alive has described the scene as “one of the most horrific” he had ever witnessed.

The first puppy was visibly fighting for its life as it was pulled from the groundRSPCA investigators and police discovered the two Jack Russell puppies buried in the garden during a visit to the property on August 25, 2011. The newborn pups were desperately fighting for life but could not be saved due to suffering from severe dehydration and diarrhoea. Vet Steve Odell had to euthanise the puppies almost immediately.

Defendants James Perks, Lorraine Perks and lodger Stephen Jenkins entered a guilty plea via their defence solicitor at a previous hearing, but were yesterday (July 25, 2012) jailed for 25 weeks. They also received a lifetime ban on keeping animals and their dogs were confiscated and handed over to the RSPCA for rehoming.
 
In total, nine dogs and 15 puppies were discovered in dirty, cramped conditions at the house – many of which had been housed in wooden rabbit hutches lying in their own faeces and urine. One hutch housed four adult terriers, while another held a Staffordshire bull terrier and her four puppies. A further two hutches both contained one adult dog each.
 
The second puppy was found with dreadful diarrhoeaThe RSPCA was alerted to the address by a routine call from a member of the public who bought a puppy from the Perks’ after seeing a card on a noticeboard. They took pity on the pup paying £50 cash for it. The puppy became very unwell, dying days later while under veterinary care.
 
When passing sentence at Burton Magistrates court yesterday, the chairman of the bench said: “If we could have we would have jailed them for far longer – they are all equally to blame because they were all residing at the same address. We did not consider a ban on them keeping dogs in future was enough and have given them a life ban from keeping any animal at all.”
 
RSPCA inspector Jayne Bashford said everyone who attended the house in August 2011 had been “shocked to the core” and claimed: “No matter how many years I work for the RSPCA this day will remain one which I will never forget.
 
The Staffordshire bull terrier and her pups as they were found“The dogs outside, confined in rabbit hutches, had no bedding and barked uncontrollably as if pleading for help. As the dogs were being checked over, a police officer was told that a puppy had died that morning and it was then that the abhorrent discovery was made of two tiny puppies gasping for breath beneath a patch of disturbed soil.
 
“This case highlights all the concerns we have with respect to irresponsible and indiscriminate breeding of dogs and the selling of those animals to unsuspecting members of the public.
 
“I am pleased with the sentence imposed; that this back street puppy breeding business has been closed down means no other dogs will suffer at their hands.”

The result also means that new homes can now be sought for the rescued animals, after Mr and Mrs Perks initially refused to sign them over to the RSPCA.

 

Images and video © RSPCA
View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz