A new biotech company has been spun out of the University of Aberdeen to provide new “tools” to help researchers trying to understand the biology and process of diseases that affect humans and animals.

A new biotech company has been spun out of the University of Aberdeen to provide new “tools” to help researchers trying to understand the biology and process of diseases that affect humans and animals.

VAb Ltd will produce and commercialise antibodies for life sciences researchers.Vertebrate Antibodies (VAb) Limited will produce and commercialise antibodies – which are created within the laboratory and mimic antibodies produced naturally in our own bodies – for life sciences researchers.

These antibodies will allow scientists to undertake new research and could also help with the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human and animal diseases.

Scientists have created man-made antibodies that can help in human health and research for more than 30 years. However, to date, little has been done to develop antibody tools for use in other species of animals.

Over the last two years, a trio of researchers at the University of Aberdeen – fish immunologist Steve Bird, experienced antibody developer Beatriz Cash and biotech commercialisation expert Ayham Alnabulsi – have honed the technique of antibody production to make it cost effective, less complicated for researchers and applicable to a range of different animals as well as people.

VAb team [L-R] Steve Bird, Beatriz Cash and Ayham AlnabulsiVAb will continue to work towards developing antibodies for human research but will provide a more extensive service for researchers working in animal health.

Dr Bird, one of the founders of VAb, said: “The tools we produce will have a massive impact on the research which today is underpinning the development of new drugs and therapies, which has enormous economic as well as health benefits.

“We are already talking to colleagues working in veterinary, agricultural and aquaculture research and management, about their priorities and how we can develop the species-specific antibody tools they desperately need for their valuable research.”

 

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