Motivated UK vets are performing twice as much CPD per year as legally required to by the RCVS, according to a pan-European survey.

On average, UK vets complete 72 hours of CPD per year - more than twice the amount required. Image © wellphoto / fotolia.
On average, UK vets complete 72 hours of CPD per year. Image © wellphoto / fotolia.

London-based CM Research questioned 2,205 practising vets in 11 countries about their CPD habits and found, on average, UK vets completed 72 hours of CPD per year – more than twice as much as the 35 hours per year (105 hours over three years) RCVS requirement.

This figure was higher than the 50 hours the Royal College of Physicians requires each year for doctors in human health, the authors stated.

It is also higher compared to vets in many other countries, including France, Germany, Sweden, Denmark and the US.

Recognising value

Responding to the survey, RCVS president Chris Tufnell said: “We have long recognised the majority of veterinary surgeons in the UK do more than the minimum we require of them regarding CPD, but this research seems to suggest most are doing far more, which is great to see.

“It demonstrates the majority of veterinary surgeons recognise the value of CPD in improving their knowledge and skills, and how this, ultimately, is reflected in the service they provide for patients and clients, as opposed to seeing it as a chore or tick-box exercise.”

Six hours a month

In the survey, vets across the 11 countries estimated, on average, they spent six hours a month on CPD, specialisation courses, lectures and other educational methods aimed at updating their professional knowledge.

The highest CPD figures were claimed by Spanish vets. In answer to the survey, they said they spent the equivalent of nearly two working days a month on improving and updating their skills.

The survey also asked how CPD was funded. Typically, in the UK, CPD is for paid by the practice. However, 38% of UK vets fully, or partially, funded annual CPD themselves.

  • Read the full story in the 17 October issue of Veterinary Times.
View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

The BVNA has announced Wendy Nevins as its new junior vice-president with immediate effect. She will become BVNA president in October, taking over from Samantha Morgan.

3 mins

Veterinary dermatologist Charlie Walker, otherwise known as the “Skin Vet”, will discuss “Canine atopic dermatitis: a multi-modal treatment approach” on 27 April.

2 mins

Red Tractor has announced all vets registered on its pig assurance scheme must be members of the Pig Veterinary Society from 1 October.

3 mins

A former pet shop that had been lying empty for years has had a £100,000 makeover to open as a veterinary surgery.

3 mins

College states 2017's elections feature a new voting platform and regular, personalised email reminders from Electoral Reform Services, making it easier for members to vote online.

5 mins

The RCVS has announced the winners of this year’s Queen’s Medal and Golden Jubilee Award – the highest honours the college can bestow on a veterinary surgeon and veterinary nurse.

4 mins