Students from the University of Edinburgh’s vet school are offering free treatment and advice for homeless people’s pets.

Biana and Andrew Gardiner
Biana Tamimi and supervising vet Andrew Gardiner offering free treatment and advice for pets of homeless people in Edinburgh.

The All4Paws clinic will see the Royal Dick students – under the guidance of vets – offer free vaccines, flea, tick and worm medications, while owners will be encouraged to sign up for The Dogs Trust Hope Scheme, which provides microchips and free spaying and neutering.

The clinic will also provide animals’ basic supplies such as winter coats, collars, leashes, toys, beds and food.

Community effort

The initiative was funded by the local community and donations, which also included supplies from Dechra Veterinary Products and Virbac.

Biana Tamimi, a fourth year student and one of the coordinators of the initiative, said: “We hope to provide those who have very few options for their pets with the best care possible.

“There are hardly any services in Edinburgh that support the pets of those that are homeless, but they deserve the same veterinary care and attention as any others.”

Ambitious aims

Senior clinical lecturer at the Royal Dick Andrew Gardiner said the school has offered a “limited” veterinary service for companion animals within several Edinburgh hostels since 2008.

“The students’ initiative is more ambitious [however], and allows the opportunity to give more in-depth care and advice when it is needed,” he said.

All4Paws’ first clinic is being held at Fort Community Centre in Edinburgh on 5 March, from 1-4pm.

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