Cattle farmers who adopt good biosecurity measures and work with their herd vet to minimise the risk of bTB will soon be able to participate in a programme offering recognition for this proactive control.

cattle farmer
Farmers who take part in the CHeCS bTB Risk-Level Certification Programme will be able to market their animals as being at lower risk of contracting or passing on the disease.

Farmers who take part in the Cattle Health Certification Standards (CHeCS) bTB Risk-Level Certification Programme – available through existing CHeCS cattle health schemes – will also be able to market their animals as being at lower risk of contracting or passing on the disease.

Risk-based trading

As well as reducing risk of infection, the initiative – which has the backing of Defra and the Welsh Government – could present risk-based trading opportunities for farmers selling cattle from regions with a high risk of the disease, or those wishing to minimise exposure from bought-in animals.

It also offers recognition for efforts to help Government and industry strategies aiming to control infection.

Congress opportunity

Delegates will be able to find out more about the certification at BCVA Congress at the Hinckley Island Hotel on 20 October from 3-3:30pm.

Here, Malla Hovi – head of veterinary and science advice to Defra’s TB programme – will give a TB policy update for England, including the forthcoming launch of the CHeCS programme.

Afterwards, CHeCS board member Andy Barrett from Kingsway Veterinary Group in North Yorkshire will give a summary of what the new programme means and how it will work.

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