A ‘revolutionary’ activity monitoring and analysis technique developed by scientists at the Royal Veterinary College is being used for the first time in a new clinical study into canine osteoarthritis.

A revolutionary activity monitoring and analysis technique developed by scientists at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) is being used for the first time in a new clinical study into canine osteoarthritis (OA).

The state of the art recorder attaches to the dog’s collar and uses miniaturised sensors based on those found in smartphones. It can distinguish between different activities independent of the dog’s location, allowing constant recording of movement in its home environment, to complement the traditional clinical assessments carried out by veterinary professionals as part of the trial.  
The state-of-the-art recorder to be used in the RVC trial.
The RVC is working with nutritional supplements firm Lintbells in order to investigate the efficacy of its joint and mobility supplement Yumove in reducing the clinical signs of osteoarthritis.

The analysis software has been developed specifically for the trial and will allow it to be the first time the real effect of a joint supplement has been measured.

However, the main aim of the 12 week study is to advance the treatment of canine OA in veterinary medicine.

Patients are now being sought to take part in the trial. Dogs eligible for the study must already have a diagnosis of OA which will be confirmed at the Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, near Potters Bar.  

The research is being led by Matthew Pead, the RVC’s academic director of professional assessment and development. He said: “The results of this study will have important clinical implications for the understanding and treatment of canine OA, with the ultimate aim of advancing the treatment of this difficult and degenerative disease for the benefit of many thousands of dogs.”

Any veterinary surgeon with a patient in their practice that might benefit from this study is invited to refer them.

  • Further details are available the Clinical Investigation Centre at the Royal Veterinary College – email cic@rvc.ac.uk or call 01707 666605.
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