The RSPCA deployed at least 60 specially-trained staff across Cumbria over the weekend to offer rescue assistance to both people and their animals.

The RSPCA deployed at least 60 specially-trained staff across Cumbria over the weekend to offer rescue assistance to both people and their animals.

The teams – approximately 20 per cent of the RSPCA’s field staff – worked with emergency services including going door-to-door with the Army in Cockermouth, as well as offering help to vulnerable people and their animals around in areas such as Workington, Kendal and Keswick.
 
floodSpeaking before the deployment on Friday, RSPCA inspectorate chief officer Tim Wass said: “We are on red alert at the moment and are ready to rescue as many people and animals as we can. We usually receive most calls 24 hours after heavy rain, so we’re on standby in case anyone needs our help.

“Our teams will be deployed where most needed and will be ready to help both humans and their animals. We’ve learned a great deal about how to help communities in crisis and will be working very closely alongside all our colleagues in the emergency services.”

The RSPCA’s national Cruelty Line will be only be able to deal with emergency calls during this crisis.

RSPCA staff from across the country were sent to the flood-hit region. Other Teams were on standby in Wales following Met Office reports that severe flooding could be expected over the weekend.

Farmers and pet owners across the region are urged wherever safe and possible to try to move animals to safety if there is a risk of flooding.

The RSPCA expects this operation to last for up to four days, although the society would like to reassure the public that it will not comprise animal welfare and any emergency cases will be dealt with as usual.

 

Flood image ©iStockphoto.com/Dageldog

 

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