A “revolutionary and game-changing” medicine is set to give vets a unique method of managing transition cows – and reduce antibiotic usage at the same time.

Elanco ImrestorThe first-of-its-kind innovation has been 26 years in the making – the past 10 by scientists at Elanco Animal Health, who have released Imrestor.

Imrestor effectively aids in restoring a cow’s natural defences during the “vital 90 days” (60 days before and 30 days after calving) when dairy cows experience a dip in their natural immunity, leaving them open to diseases, such as mastitis, metritis and retained placenta.

Imrestor is a form of the naturally occurring protein cytokine, bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (bG-CSF) and is not an antibiotic.

New weapon

In launching the product, scores of the UK’s leading dairy vets at a meeting in Preston heard Imrestor is a new weapon in their armoury to fight the major problem of immune suppression around calving.

Fiona Anderson, technical manager (ruminant division) at Elanco, said: “Imrestor really is revolutionary because it’s the first product that affects the innate immune response.

“We’ve had many products that affect the acquired immune response – vaccines – but this is an innovation because it’s the first one that affects the innate immune response, which is a non-specific ability to fight all infections.”

  • More on the launch of Imrestor can be found in the 18 July issue of Veterinary Times.
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