Martin Lacey, owner of the Great British Circus, will be folding his tents for the last time due, he says, to proposed changes in the law banning the use of wild animals in circuses.

The largest wild animal circus in the UK is to close and sell its animals.

A tiger from the Great British Circus, circa 2004.Martin Lacey, owner of the Great British Circus, will be folding his tents for the last time due, he says, to proposed changes in the law banning the use of wild animals in circuses.

In 2009, Animal Defenders International (ADI) secretly secured video footage at the circus, which it claimed showed elephants being beaten by keepers and chained for up to 11 hours each day.

After years of lobbying from animal rights groups, the Government has promised to introduce legislation banning the use of wild animals in circuses.

Jan Creamer, president of ADI said: “We have shown incidents of animal cruelty and suffering at the Great British Circus on a number of occasions so we are pleased that animals will no longer suffer at this circus.

Great British Circus flyer from 2010“But there is no real need to stop the circus altogether – these businesses can continue successfully with just human performers and there are many shows that do that.”

The RSPCA also welcomed the news. “We hope this marks the beginning of the end for all the wild animals unfortunate enough to be part of a circus act in England today.

“This decision was allegedly prompted by the ban on wild animals in travelling circuses proposed by the Westminster government in May. If this is the case, we hope other circuses follow its lead.

“But we are concerned about the animals advertised for sale and hope they will go to happy new homes to live out the rest of their lives. We are offering help with any rehoming.”

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz