A leading referral practice in Hampshire has been given the green light to build a treatment centre for cats with hyperthyroidism.

Anderson Moores
Anderson Moores’ premises near Winchester.

Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists is hoping to have the facility – which will use radioiodine therapy to treat the condition – completed in three months at its base near Winchester.

The centre will be one of only 11 in the UK and aims to help reduce the waiting time for cats awaiting treatment.

Gold standard

Davina Anderson, European and RCVS recognised vet specialist, said: “We’re delighted to be able to get the go-ahead to build this facility and will start construction work imminently.

“Radioiodine therapy is the gold standard of treatment for hyperthyroidism in cats, far exceeding the results seen with surgery or oral medication.

“We intend to offer a service tailor-made to each individual cat and their family, with their clinical history and circumstances screened before they travel to us. This is to ensure treatment with radioiodine therapy is the correct therapeutic decision.

Davina Anderson
Davina Anderson, European and RCVS recognised vet specialist at Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists.

“The 10 other centres in the UK providing this treatment are spread few and far between, and we hope opening this facility will help to reduce waiting lists for cats awaiting treatment, particularly across southern England.”

Specialist staff

The centre will be run and managed by boarded specialists in internal medicine, supported by boarded cardiologists and highly qualified nurses. It will also have the capacity to address other clinical concerns, if necessary.

Dr Anderson added: “Cats presented with hyperthyroidism are older, more fragile and potentially have other concurrent conditions. It’s very rare for a cat under seven years of age to develop hyperthyroidism.

“The treatment of cats with hyperthyroidism involves a single injection of radioactive iodine, followed by isolation in a radiation-proof facility for two weeks.

“Cats usually respond extremely well to treatment, and if the condition is recognised early and treated appropriately then the outlook for the affected cat is generally very good, which is why this new facility at Anderson Moores is something positive for cats in the UK.”

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