A dog in Malawi had its life saved after the Worldwide Veterinary Service (WVS) took swift action and performed vital surgery. 

Tiger was taken to Mission Rabies after her  owner had noticed a lump.

Tiger was taken to the Mission Rabies project by Flora, the granddaughter of the dog’s owner, for a rabies injection.

At the appointment, Flora said her grandmother had noticed a big lump on Tiger’s abdomen that they suspected was a tumour. While Tiger had been to see a veterinary paraprofessional, the treatment prescribed was unaffordable for the owners.

Helping out

Swinging into action, Mission Rabies called its WVS colleagues and took Tiger and Flora to the WVS clinic in Zomba.

An examination revealed the lump was not a tumour, but rather, a very large abdominal hernia, most likely caused by a trauma.

Tiger being operated on to remove the abdominal hernia.

International veterinary manager Dagmar Mayer operated on Tiger, repairing the hernia, as well as sterilising her.

The team delivered Tiger back to her family and were greeted by the grateful owners and their neighbours, who couldn’t believe the dog had been treated free of charge.

Local outreach

The WVS recently opened its new veterinary outreach clinic in Zomba.

The project, led by Dr Mayer, aims to care for the cat and dog population there – they sterilised 23 dogs and two cats on their first day alone, and have operated on 100 in total.

For more information, visit https://wvs.org.uk/news

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of


related content

Identifying and diagnosing ocular disorders in dogs is explored in a new video that aims to refresh clinicians' knowledge of the topic.

3 mins

Two new cases of Babesia have been confirmed in untravelled UK dogs, lending weight to predictions the disease could spread this autumn and next spring.

5 mins

A roundtable event on critical care management is to take place at this year's London Vet Show.

4 mins

One of the world’s most respected specialists in veterinary internal medicine is to lecture at London Vet Show.

3 mins

Common diseases are common, but, as Gayle Hallowell explains, "zebra"-type cardiac conditions do occur – and can be diagnosed using a care-based approach.

23 mins

More than 500 delegates looked forward at CVS' annual conference at the Birmingham Metropole Hotel earlier this month.

4 mins