A Yorkshire couple were so pleased by efforts made by staff at Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies to help their dog that they plan to leave the institution £100,000 in their wills.

A Yorkshire couple were so pleased by efforts made by staff at Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies to help their dog that they plan to leave the institution £100,000 in their wills.

Jet, as he may have looked outside the new Edinburgh school.The money being left by Michael and Sue Dennis will be used to support disadvantaged veterinary students who would otherwise not be able to afford to study at the school.

The couple consulted staff at the school about their Labrador Jet when he was two, after he was diagnosed with arthritis in his front legs. The Dennis’ had been told that Jet was unlikely to live long but they decided to seek specialist advice from the Edinburgh team after seeing television coverage of the school.

The retired couple, form North Yorkshire, believe that the advice they received from the school helped Jet to live to the age of 10. He died in 2008.

Elaine Watson, head of the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary StudiesRecalling events, Mr Dennis said: “We contacted the vet school and they were very keen to try and help us if they could, so we took Jet in to see them. We spoke to a great professor and he gave the dog a very thorough examination and spent a lot of time with us. We were very impressed with the care and attention that we had from the school.

“Although there was no medication prescribed, they did advise us on how to manage his lifestyle, with shorter walks, regular exercise and plenty of fun and attention. Jet lived until he was 10 and in the intervening eight years he had a very happy and reasonably active life.”

Commenting on the school being included in Dennis will, Elaine Watson, head of the school told Vetsonline: “We very much appreciate the generosity of Mr and Mrs Dennis in supporting the work of the Dick Vet. With funds raised we will be able to sponsor students who otherwise would not have been able to study veterinary medicine. Such support that helps invest in the next generation of vets is immensely welcome.”

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz