Final year veterinary students at the University of Glasgow have finished shooting their traditional naked calendar, which raises funds for worthy causes.

girls
A bridge too far?
Feeling a bit sheepish, boys?
Feeling a bit sheepish, boys?

All profits from the calendar will be donated to two charities:

  • Students for Animals in Need (SAIN), which raises money for companion animals and horses in need of referral care
  • Trusty Paws, which provides free veterinary care for pets of Glasgow’s homeless

Confidence boost

Final year student Jess Simmonds said: “Taking part in the calendar was great fun.

“Our year is very close, but we were definitely all nervous about getting our kit off together. Once we did though, it was hilarious and everyone was comfortable. Seeing the photos afterwards was a great confidence boost.”

While it is not known how the naked calendar tradition started, it’s something final year students have organised and taken part in for many years.

Memento

Miss Simmonds said: “It’s fantastic to have something to take part in and remember our time at Glasgow by.

“We’d like to thank everyone who took part in the calendar – from final years who braved the west coast weather to get ‘taps aff’, to our sponsors Broadleys Veterinary Hospital and Pets’n’Vets.”

The 2017 calendars are available online now and cost £10 each plus postage.

  • To order, email guvscalendar2016@gmail.com, stating the number of copies required. Further details will then be given to arrange a bank transfer.
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