A new survey has shown 22% of vets have witnessed dogs die as a result of injuries sustained when travelling in a car without proper restraint.

Dog in car
Image: molotok743 / Fotolia.

28% of owners, meanwhile, never restrain their pet when travelling in the car.

Faulty findings

Direct Line Pet Insurance questioned 1,390 pet owners and 100 vets in the study, other findings from which include:

  • 18% of vets have treated animals with injuries as a result of being poorly restrained in the car – ranging from broken bones (39%) to minor injuries such as bruising (33%)
  • the safest methods of restraint for dogs are seat belt and harness, crate/cage or a barrier between the boot and the back seat
  • vets have witnessed dangerous restraints including letting the animal roam free, holding it on passengers laps and even putting a chain or rope around the animal’s neck

Rule 57 of the Highway Code states that when in a vehicle, owners must make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained to reduce the risk of distraction while driving.

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1 Comment on "Fifth of vets see dogs injured from improper car restraint"

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Wendy
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Wendy
2 months 22 days ago

i believe it is selfish not to harness dogs in a car, as they can get seriously hurt, even if you break gently they can slide off the seat. I have four dogs. Not one of my dogs ever travels in the car without a harness fitted properly & connected to a seatbelt. I love my dogs, they should be cared for at all times!! Not to mention the dangers of the driver not concentrating. It should be a law clamped down on by the police.

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