An online MSc in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia has been added to the University of Edinburgh Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies’ master’s programmes and online CPD.

Natalie Finch anaesthesia monitoring.
Delegates can improve their anaesthesia knowledge while working in an associated field. IMAGE: Natalie Finch.

The distance learning programme is designed to be a flexible, part-time method of study to fit around other work or family commitments, and to improve knowledge of anaesthesia while working in an associated field.

With the growth of degree veterinary nursing programmes, the MSc is also open to non-veterinary graduates with appropriate experience in anaesthesia, enabling graduate nurses to gain a high level postgraduate qualification.

What’s involved

The programme consists of a foundation of core courses, followed by a choice of different species courses. Later in the programme, students can choose from a range of courses in more advanced areas to tailor the programme to their interests.

The final part of the MSc is the dissertation year, which could be a research project, extended literature review or other piece of analytical written work.

Many options

Many options for the dissertation are possible, subject to approval. Students could opt to take the foundation and two species courses for a postgraduate certificate, or take optional courses in addition without the dissertation, and qualify with a postgraduate diploma.

For more information, visit www.ed.ac.uk/vet/veterinary-anaesthesia or email msc-vaa@ed.ac.uk

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

RVN Sophie Beckwith questions who is best suited to the role of a human resources position in a veterinary clinic – a practice team member or an HR-trained individual?

27 mins

A leading authority on Schmallenberg virus is warning farm vets to be prepared for the possibility of a springtime spike in cases of abnormal births and deformities in sheep and cattle.

4 mins

Scientists believe they may have identified the mystery cause of “shaking piglets” – cases of which have been reported in Europe and abroad since the 1920s.

Kelly Bowlt Blacklock looks at studies on companion animal wound care, focusing on emerging techniques (part 1/2).

12 mins

Annamaria Nagy and Sue Dyson investigate some of the advances in diagnostic imaging in horses using studies on techniques to discover injuries.

28 mins

SVN Simon Johnson discusses the preconceptions he faces as a man in a predominately female profession and how this can be addressed in the future.

18 mins