A dog had 4ft of its intestines removed after swallowing a corn on the cob.

Emily and Sam
PDSA vet Emily Frazer with Sam and a corn on the cob similar to the one he swallowed.

Rhodesian ridgeback crossbreed Sam underwent an emergency operation to remove around half of his small intestine after PDSA vets discovered the corn husk was causing it to rot away.

PDSA senior vet Susie Hermit, from the charity’s pet hospital in Glasgow, said it was one of the most severe cases she had ever seen.

Irreversible damage

She said: “We found the corn on the cob husk was causing a major blockage in Sam’s small intestine, restricting the blood supply.

“Unfortunately, some of the damage was irreversible and we had to remove around half of his intestine, which had begun to die off and rot.

“Sam was very lucky to survive. He was at high risk of developing potentially fatal blood poisoning and the operation to remove such a large section of his intestines was incredibly risky.”

Fight of his life

Sam’s owner Lorraine Graham said: “I couldn’t believe it when PDSA x-rayed him and told us what was causing the blockage. We hadn’t been eating corn on the cob, so he must have picked it up while outside.

“He was so weak and lethargic, I knew he was facing the fight of his life. Thankfully, he pulled through and I can’t thank PDSA enough for saving him.”

Corn on the cob was one of the most common items removed from pets in 2015, with 28 cases treated by PDSA. Other strange items swallowed by pets include bones (51 cases) and kebab sticks (7 cases).

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

The shortlists have been revealed for the seventh annual Ceva Animal Welfare Awards, to be held in Birmingham in April.

6 mins

Vet professionals can learn how to approach suspected cruelty cases with confidence and play their part in helping prevent animal, domestic and child abuse at a specialised training day in June.

3 mins

Veterinary staff will be able to learn about the links between domestic abuse and non-accidental injury to animals, and how to recognise and deal with such cases.

3 mins

A vet has spoken of her astonishment after an x-ray of a Staffordshire bull terrier puppy revealed an 8in kitchen knife lodged inside its body.

5 mins

The next meeting of the Association of Charity Vets will take place at Wood Green, The Animals Charity's Godmanchester Animal Centre on 25 February.

2 mins

Those spearheading the VN Futures initiative update readers on the joint RCVS/BVNA initiative, with an overview of its first working party meeting.

14 mins