A new organisation has been established to set standards, organise and oversee the self-regulation of the animal behaviourist and dog training sector.

A new organisation has been established to set standards, organise and oversee the self-regulation of the animal behaviourist and dog training sector.
 
The veterinary profession has long recognised the need to be able to refer cases for behaviour modification treatment, but there are a limited number of veterinary behaviourists and until now there has been widespread concern from the veterinary profession that unqualified people may be acting as animal behaviourists, which may have serious consequences for the welfare of animals in their care.
 
Rachel CaseyWith this in mind, and in response to the Companion Animal Welfare Council’s (CAWC) recommendations for self-regulation in 2008, the Animal Behaviour and Training Council will be launched on September 24.
 
Rachel Casey, senior lecturer in companion animal behaviour and welfare at the University of Bristol, said: “The ABTC is a very important step forward in raising standards in animal training and behaviour. There is currently a plethora of organisations and individuals with different experience, qualifications and post-nominals, which makes it difficult for animal owners to differentiate individuals with the right skills for the needs of their animals.
 
“The distinct practitioner types recognised by the ABTC will enable the public to identify a suitable person for their needs and that the standards of practice in training and behaviour will continue to rise.”

Dr Casey concluded: “The veterinary profession will be able to easily identify suitable practitioners for referral of animals with behaviour problems, and give them peace of mind as to their level of expertise.”

For further information, visit www.abtcouncil.org.uk

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz