The British Veterinary Association (BVA) has welcomed news that the new EU directive, aimed at reducing the number of animals used in lab experiments, requires all animal testing facilities to employ a qualified vet to advise on the treatment of animals.

The British Veterinary Association (BVA) has welcomed news that the new EU directive, aimed at reducing the number of animals used in laboratory experiments, requires all animal testing facilities to employ a qualified vet to advise on the treatment of animals.
 
New EU directive requires all EU animal testing facilities to have a trained vet to advise on the well-being and treatment of the animals.Despite RSPCA concerns that the new directive risks “watering down” current UK standards, the BVA welcomed the announcement.
 
President Bill Reilly said: “The UK already has a firm commitment to the principle of the Three Rs (replace refine, reduce) and the BVA is pleased that MEPs have voted to firmly anchor this principle in the new legislation so that the practice can be implemented across the EU.
 
“The BVA is also pleased that the new directive requires all establishments within the EU to have a designated veterinarian with expertise in laboratory animal medicine, charged with advisory duties in relation to the well-being and treatment of the animals.
 
“The responsible use of animals in research has improved both human and animal welfare, but we believe animals should only be used where no non-animal alternative is available and the work is justified through independent ethical scrutiny.”
 
Prof Reilly added: “The BVA continues to support the principle of the Three Rs and is committed to advocating for a reduction in animal usage in the future.”

 

Image ©iStockphoto.com/dra_schwartz
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