A handful of lucky students were given a helping hand by the BVA Overseas Group after receiving grants of £500 each. The BVA travel grant enables students to gain experience in dealing with exotic diseases abroad.

A handful of lucky students were given a helping hand by the BVA Overseas Group after receiving grants of £500 each.

Anna Frykors von Hekkel was awarded a grant to help her undertake an evaluation of the diet and body condition score of two captive elephant populations in Sri Lanka.The scheme was introduced in 1983 to provide assistance where required and to enable students to gain experience in dealing with exotic diseases abroad.

This year, Anna Frykfors von Hekkel of the RVC was awarded a grant to help her undertake an evaluation of the diet and body condition score of two captive elephant populations in Sri Lanka.

Emily Jeannes, of the University of Liverpool Veterinary School, also received £500 to investigate the zoonotic risk posed by Toxocara canis infection in dogs in Sri Lanka.

On hearing that she had been awarded a grant, Anna said: “When I saw the heading ‘BVA Travel Grant’ in my inbox, my predominant feeling was one of nerves, and it did take me a few excruciating minutes to open the message. Finding out I had been awarded the grant, quite literally, made my month. It afforded me not only an extraordinary research project, but the opportunity to experience a beautiful country and an inspiring culture. For that I am very grateful.”

The Donkey Sanctuary once again linked up with the BVA Overseas Group to provide an opportunity for University of Cambridge veterinary school graduate, Philip Manning, to undertake a project at one of its sites in India.

Emily Jeanes received a £500 grant to investigate the zoonotic risk posed by Toxocara canis infection in dogs in Sri Lanka.Highlighting the value of the travel grants, Karen Reed, chairman of the BVA Overseas Group, said: “The BVA has long recognised the value in giving students the chance to gain experience in the prevention and control of exotic and emerging animal diseases – ever-present threats in the face of globalisation and climate change.

“Since 1983, the BVA travel scholarship scheme has also given students an opportunity to develop and adapt their clinical skills, and – perhaps even more importantly – to develop the beneficial life skills of communication, adaptability and open-mindedness.

“In a world where more than one billion people depend on animals for their livelihood, the veterinary profession’s role in global animal and public health is becoming increasingly significant in the face of challenges brought about by emerging diseases, climate change and sustainable development. The Overseas Group is heartened by the considerable interest from veterinary students wishing to work in developing countries.”

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