UK political party Animals Count is said to be “extremely disappointed” about the Conservatives forming the new UK Government, claiming that animal protection is very likely to be put on hold, if not repealed by the Tories.

UK political party Animals Count is said to be “extremely disappointed” about the Conservatives forming the new UK Government, claiming that animal protection is very likely to be put on hold, if not repealed by the Tories.

David CameronAnimals Count (AC) launched its criticism of the Conservatives in a statement on its website, following deputy leader, Richard Deboo‘s defeat in his Islington South & Finsbury constituency, where he received just 149 votes (0.3% of the total vote).

The party claimed the 131-page 2010 Conservative manifesto pledged to “promote high animal welfare standards”, but provided “few additional details”.

Although the Tory manifesto does emphasise wildlife protection and habitat conservation, AC claimed: “While these issues are undoubtedly important, some may consider that, in welfare terms, they pale into relative insignificance compared to the welfare problems faced by nearly a billion UK farm animals.”

It went on: “The only details provided of any programme to address farm animal welfare is a commitment to a ‘carefully managed and science-led policy of badger control in areas with high and persistent levels of [bovine tuberculosis]’.”

The party also claimed that, at the time of writing, neither animal welfare nor protection was included within the list of policy areas on the Conservative Party website, save for a booklet on farming that primarily focused on the promotion and protection of British farming – including the development of an animal health policy in partnership with farmers and veterinarians.

Animals Count deputy leader Richard DebooDespite this, AC pointed out that “no obvious mention is made of the overwhelming majority of animal welfare policy areas”, including most farmed species, long-distance animal transportation, religious slaughter, companion animals, animals in laboratories, and animals in sport and entertainment (including zoos and circuses).

The party also claimed to have gleaned “additional insights” into Conservative policy on animal welfare during a meeting with former MP Roger Gale, president of the Conservative Animal Welfare (CAW), from which it deduced that Mr Gale “believed all major parties considered the big political issues to be the economy, health, education, defence and policing, and that voters would be unlikely to give much weight to animal issues.”

The AC statement concluded: “The impression given was that, in the current economic climate, animal welfare was likely to be a very low priority for any incoming government.”

“We regret the recent turn of events and hope that a possible change in electoral reform may help to finally make people’s vote count, and thereby ensure that animals count.”

 

David Cameron image © World Economic Forum
View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz