A woman has been disqualified from keeping animals after pleading guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to her pet dog by leaving it with an eye condition for more than five years.

Pooch before
Pooch has a congenital condition that caused his right eye to erupt.

Trudy Oakley, of Redmile Walk, Peterborough, was sentenced at Peterborough Magistrates’ Court on 9 May having admitted one offence of causing unnecessary suffering to Staffordshire bull terrier Pooch by failing to provide adequate veterinary care for a problem with his eyes.

The RSPCA was called by a member of the public on 27 January and inspector Justin Stubbs attended Oakley’s property.


Mr Stubbs said: “Pooch was in a terrible state and his eye looked horrendous. It was like something out of a horror movie – his eyeball looked ready to pop out of his skull.

“Oakley received veterinary advice in December 2010 to have Pooch’s eye removed, but this was ignored and she failed to seek further professional advice.

Pooch after
Despite receiving treatment, Pooch may still lose his remaining eye.

“That means poor Pooch was left suffering from what must have been an extremely painful and uncomfortable eye condition for more than five years. It’s just shocking.”

Pooch was seized by the police, placed in the RSPCA’s care and rushed to a vet to remove his eye. He has a congenital condition that caused his right eye to erupt, which also affects his left eye.


Oakley was sentenced to a two-year conditional discharge for one offence under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. The court also added six months on to an existing suspended sentence for an unrelated matter and ordered her to pay prosecution costs of £250.

She was disqualified from keeping animals for one year and the court ordered Pooch be removed from her ownership. He is being cared for by the RSPCA and undergoing treatment. It is likely the 10-year-old dog will lose his remaining eye.

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