A trial has, for the first time, found solid data to support anecdotal reports of the positive impact therapy dogs can have on children with cancer.

Image: ©iStock/Libortom
Image: ©iStock/Libortom

The study is part of the Canines and Childhood Cancer (CCC) research project, run by the American Humane Association and funded by Zoetis, looking at the effects of animal assisted therapy (AAT) on the child, the family and the therapy dog.

So far, the trial has enrolled 68 children diagnosed with cancer of ages ranging from 3 to 17 years. Thirty-nine of the children are in the AAT treatment group and 29 are in the control group.

Researchers expect to enrol around the same number again before the study ends in 2016. Preliminary findings suggest therapy dogs have a beneficial calming effect on both the children and the parents of the young patients.

View your activity >

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar

wpDiscuz

related content

Hany Elsheikha discusses the clinical impact of this parasite, as well as approaches for treating and preventing infestation, regarding canine and feline patients.

27 mins

Debbie Gow and Hilary Jackson discuss the options available for using these types of therapies, including the various protocols and side effects.

28 mins

Glen Cousquer and Kenneth Boyd consider ethical decision-making in exotic and wildlife medicine, focusing on key terms and the human-animal bond.

36 mins

Lucy Irvine and Erin Thompson provide an insight into an encouraging campaign run by University of Glasgow School of Veterinary Medicine students.

21 mins

More companion animal studies and research go under the spotlight in Alex Gough's latest Research Review.

12 mins

Ross Tiffin reports on his visit to Vets4Pets Lisburn Longstone and how it has succeeded as a feline friendly clinic.

11 mins