Almost 700 VNs were removed from the Register of Veterinary Nurses at the beginning of this year as a result of not renewing with the RCVS.

VNs removed stamp
Vet nurses who have been removed from the register and wish to be restored should contact the RCVS registration department.

On 1 January, 692 VNs had their names removed from the register, although 205 subsequently applied to have their name restored.

Reminders

Communications were sent to RVNs last year to remind them their annual renewal was due – including via email, text, letter, in RCVS News and through the veterinary press.

Nicola South, customer experience manager and head of registration at the RCVS, said: “Veterinary nurses must renew their registration by the end of every year because, if their name is removed from the register, they will no longer be able to perform acts of minor surgery or medical treatment as defined under Schedule 3 of the Veterinary Surgeons Act.

“Furthermore, the restoration fee is £51, this is in addition to the annual renewal fee of £61 for veterinary nurses, so it represents a significant extra cost.”

Employee check

The RCVS recommends practices carry out checks to ensure VNs they employ are on the register. Employers, VNs and others can also use the online “check the register” search tool, which is updated daily. Alternatively, veterinary nurses removed from the register and not restored before 27 January will appear on the 2015-16 removals list.

Those who have been removed from the register and want to be restored can do so by contacting the RCVS registration department on telephone 020 7202 0707 or emailing registration@rcvs.org.uk

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